Bench DC power supply recommendation

PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
I'm looking for a bench DC power supply with a digital current meter that actually displays the output current (down to 1mA accuracy), any suggestions?

I bought a (relatively) inexpensive model this week, but the thing doesn't display the output current unless you're in Constant Current mode.... that's useless to me.

Single channel is fine, at least 1A.
I need at least 0 - 18V range, but 30V or 60V wouldn't be a bad thing either.
I'd prefer new just so I don't have to try to hunt one down or get in a bidding war.
 

fig

Well-known member
I use this one "LONGWEI". $50 on Bezos' site. 0-30vdc/0-10a. It does the job, the fan is not terribly loud. I haven't tried cramming 10amps through it, as I haven't updated my homeowner's policy in some time.


PS: footprint-wise, it seems a "LONGWEI" from front to rear.
Edit: Accuracy states ±1%±1 .61idx-9R0VL._SL1500_.jpg
 
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PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
I looked at that one but the display doesn't look like it's capable of displaying below 10mA (there is no decimal point on the far left).

Does this one display the current draw when in "Voltage" mode?
 

temol

Active member
I'm looking for a similar bench power supply too. Nothing special so far.. there's couple models under different names/brands, with x.xxxx or x.xxxxx ampmeter. ZHAOXIN RPS-3005D for example. Or YIHUA 3005D. ZHAOXIN - linear, YIHUA - switched mode. There's some more brands with similar model name - 3005. I'd take ZHAOXIN (because it's linear) but I've read some complaints about this model - small heatsink causing fan running too often, etc.

 

PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
The 3005D looks similar to the Dr Meter PS-305DM that I recently ordered...

On this one the current meter display is disabled when you're in Constant Voltage mode....

Also the Run/Stop button seemed like a great idea, but when you "stop" the power supply the voltage meter doesn't display the voltage setting, so you have no idea what the voltage is set to until you hit the button again. This makes the Run/Stop button virtually useless in my opinion. On higher-end power supplies you can disable the output, adjust the voltage to the desired level (and SEE the voltage setting on the display), then enable it again.

I'll have to check out the 3005D, I don't particular care if the supply is switching or linear and I'll likely never run enough current for heat to be much of an issue....

Right now I'm eyeballing the Siglent SPD1305X, but in reality it has a bunch of bells and whistles that I don't have any use for.
 

fig

Well-known member
I looked at that one but the display doesn't look like it's capable of displaying below 10mA (there is no decimal point on the far left).

Does this one display the current draw when in "Voltage" mode?
It does show current with the voltage set, but sounds like it wouldn't suit your needs with mA (I shoulda read your OP more closely).
 

mjh36

Active member
Hey I don't really know what to look for, but check this link from Banggood, they got lot's of weird stuff, I got my digital multimeter from them.

 

PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
So just a little update on the Dr Meter PS-305DM power supply....

Turns out it does display the current output while in Constant Voltage mode... mine is defective.

I discovered that if I put pressure on the Coarse Current knob the display starts working, so I cracked it up, resoldered the pot lugs, and now the display is working... but it's not accurate, and the calibration trim isn't able to adjust it into spec.

So, this one will be going back. Not sure if I'm going to try again, or move on to another model.
 

temol

Active member
While reading about the SPD1305X I came across this power supply - OWON P4603. The specs are quite ok, same with the price. But then I started googling about this model and I'm afraid that there's one issue that stops me from buying it - voltage spikes at startup.

 

PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
Coincidentally I was looking at the Korad KD3005D, but one reviewer reported voltage spikes at power down....
 

music6000

Well-known member
So just a little update on the Dr Meter PS-305DM power supply....

Turns out it does display the current output while in Constant Voltage mode... mine is defective.

I discovered that if I put pressure on the Coarse Current knob the display starts working, so I cracked it up, resoldered the pot lugs, and now the display is working... but it's not accurate, and the calibration trim isn't able to adjust it into spec.

So, this one will be going back. Not sure if I'm going to try again, or move on to another model.
 

Many__Of__Horror

Active member
What did you end up going with?

Also I keep seeing linear or switchable, does it matter for us? Plus how do you tell what a unit is. I am looking at this one that appears to cover what I would need as a starter unit, but having never used one I want to make sure I am not missing out on a functionality that is useful down the road etc
 
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PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
I returned the Dr Meter and haven't gotten around to replacing it yet....

Linear will have a heavy AC power transformer and a linear regulator. They'll typically supply more current, have a more stable/cleaner DC output, but they'll weigh significantly more (than switching) and are generally more expensive.

Switching will have an SMPS power supply with a much smaller (higher frequency) transformer. It'll be lightweight in comparison, have lower current output, and more prone to switching noise (oscillation from the SMPS) on the DC output.

This is of course relative to the price range we're discussing... things are a bit different if you're talking about high dollar lab-grade equipment.

If both were an option (with otherwise similar specs) I'd choose linear, but switching isn't a deal breaker. If I was charging batteries, working with critical digital equipment, or recording/playing gigs powered from the thing then I would be pickier, but for troubleshooting / testing / development I don't particularly care.
 

JetFixxxer

Active member
I'm not getting any readings with a 4.7K.. it still shows 0.000. If I turn it a bit faster it hits between .0001 ~ .0005 for a split second.
 

PedalPCB

Administrator
Staff member
Cool thanks, that's what I needed to know.

Most of these have a minimum current (10mA or more) before you'll get any reading.

I'll probably have to just break down and use a DMM (or one of those OneSpot mA Meters) if I'm going to avoid spending several hundred dollars on a DC power supply that I'll only use here and there.
 

JetFixxxer

Active member
Aaah.. I only check it when I first got it at 5v with a 10Ω and it current was .478..

At 9.0v w/2KΩ I get .0001 @ .009w anything higher than that I get no current reading.
 
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