Onespot CS12 mounting

ADAOCE

Well-known member
I just mounted mine this week. I cut a couple of pieces of wood to fill the gap between the included brackets and the wood surface of my pedalboard. Then screwed from the bottom.
I thought about doing this but doesn’t the wood piece cover the vents on the side? It might not actually matter in the end
 

daeg

Well-known member
Just a quick hijack if you don't mind: my wife bought me a wooden pedalboard and I was wondering what brand of Velcro would be best (I've never had a pedalboard before, when I played love I only ever used two). I was reading reviews on Amazon and there seem to be lots of complaints about the glue not lasting.
My advice is you need way less velcro than you think you do. I started off with some super strong stuff and it took all of my might to peel pedals off the board. It also flexed and stressed the board every time I needed to move pedals around.

Now I do two small strips of generic velcro on each pedal and that's PLENTY.
 

ADAOCE

Well-known member
My advice is you need way less velcro than you think you do. I started off with some super strong stuff and it took all of my might to peel pedals off the board. It also flexed and stressed the board every time I needed to move pedals around.

Now I do two small strips of generic velcro on each pedal and that's PLENTY.
I’ll second this. I did 2” strip covering the entire back of the pedals and covered basically the entire mounting surface too and it’s a reall pain to get them off sometimes
 

JamieJ

Well-known member

There is another option. I think it’s from 4:26 in this video that uses dual lock on the sides of the power supply.
 

ADAOCE

Well-known member

There is another option. I think it’s from 4:26 in this video that uses dual lock on the sides of the power supply.
Interesting. This is going to bug me because I like the idea of the brackets but wish it wasn’t just for pedaltrains. It really wouldn’t have been that hard for them to make another bracket that flush mounts it. I really may try to make a set.
 

daeg

Well-known member
Here's how the brackets worked out on my CS7's. Notice that the brackets wouldn't reach the board on their own, so finishing washers were used to bridge that small distance and provide a solid connection. The machined screws going into Power Supply were included with the CS7. I don't recall the size of the wood screws but I do remember I bought them at ACE.

4096-3072-max.jpeg
 

ADAOCE

Well-known member
Here's how the brackets worked out on my CS7's. Notice that the brackets wouldn't reach the board on their own, so finishing washers were used to bridge that small distance and provide a solid connection. The machined screws going into Power Supply were included with the CS7. I don't recall the size of the wood screws but I do remember I bought them at ACE.

View attachment 20519
Oh snap I’m just gonna do this. Super easy. Do you remember what you got the brackets? I got plenty of finish washers and screws
 

Bricksnbeatles

Well-known member
Just a quick hijack if you don't mind: my wife bought me a wooden pedalboard and I was wondering what brand of Velcro would be best (I've never had a pedalboard before, when I played love I only ever used two). I was reading reviews on Amazon and there seem to be lots of complaints about the glue not lasting.
I’ve had the best luck with the industrial strength Velcro brand stuff.

https://smile.amazon.com/dp/B00006RSP1/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_glt_fabc_FM7FF4ZTQ53J95VR0F2Z
 

daeg

Well-known member
The first time I setup the pedalboard it was this velcro. The pedals went on great... but pulling them off the board turned into a life-or-death struggle.

1640889172241.png
 

Stickman393

Well-known member
Velcro...my old nemesis.

Something I had a problem with in my early days was when I would go gigging. Inevitably my pedals would come loose from the board...not because the Velcro had failed, but because the *adhesive* had.

It's useful to note that even industrial strength Velcro has temperature limitations. Some have a failure point in the range of 110 degrees...

Sure, they won't be exposed to that most of the time. Unless...you put your board in a car on a summer day. Woof. Big ol mess.

I love me some dual locks but even with that stuff you have to select the correct adhesive backing. The Velcro website has all the information one needs to be able to determine what product # has what adhesive.

Food for thought. A solid mechanical solution that avoids adhesives all together is always going to be a great option.
 

giovanni

Well-known member
I have had the same problem in the past. I don’t think I’ve figured out a solution yet but some pedals have a worse surface than others so I learned to work with that a bit.
 

ADAOCE

Well-known member
@Stickman393 that’s a very good point. I don’t do a ton of gigging or anything so my board is not exposed to such extremes but for others I would totally prefer a mechanical solution. Even for my uses though with a power supply this heavy mounted under I’m likely staying away from Velcro/DL
 

Harry Klippton

Well-known member
Oooh I'm glad this thread got bumped. @ADAOCE I got some questions for you about your pedalboard build. I recently picked back up on the builds I started in like 2019? I've got my front, back, and sides cut, and made half blind dovetails. Then I realized that my front and back pieces have 90° angles on the top, but they should match the angle of the sides. How do you do that? It's a stupid question, but I'm just pretending I know what I'm doing 😂
 

ADAOCE

Well-known member
Oooh I'm glad this thread got bumped. @ADAOCE I got some questions for you about your pedalboard build. I recently picked back up on the builds I started in like 2019? I've got my front, back, and sides cut, and made half blind dovetails. Then I realized that my front and back pieces have 90° angles on the top, but they should match the angle of the sides. How do you do that? It's a stupid question, but I'm just pretending I know what I'm doing 😂
Hey so I think my dad glued everything up and then used his table saw to cut the angle of the board then routed the edges and sanded smooth. I’ve attached a couple pictures and I’ll get an actual answer in the meantime.

If you have your side pieces cut with the angles in there and the front and back pieces t varying heights you should be able to join them and then sand the front and back edges to match the angle of the sides.
 

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