Partscaster build

SYLV9ST9R

Well-known member
Thank you so much for this! This is a wonderful guide that I plan to use.
+1
Did you do all your drilling by hand? I've been setting my project back until I can have access to a drill press, as I'm unsure of my drilling 50% of the time when drilling enclosures...
You think I should run thru the setup process? I'm sure someone might find it useful.
I know som stuff, but you shouldn't assume that! ;)
 

thewintersoldier

Well-known member
+1
Did you do all your drilling by hand? I've been setting my project back until I can have access to a drill press, as I'm unsure of my drilling 50% of the time when drilling enclosures...

I know som stuff, but you shouldn't assume that! ;)
For drilling it depends. I have a drill press but only use it for enclosures and guitar things that absolutely have to be straight. Most hardware installation I do with a hand drill. As far as the set up goes I'll run thru the steps. It's pretty simple and every guitar player should know how to do it because it's such a personal thing.
 

SYLV9ST9R

Well-known member
For drilling it depends. I have a drill press but only use it for enclosures and guitar things that absolutely have to be straight. Most hardware installation I do with a hand drill. As far as the set up goes I'll run thru the steps. It's pretty simple and every guitar player should know how to do it because it's such a personal thing.
I'm pretty good with my Strat, but the 3 saddles Tele bridge scares me.
 

mnemonic

Active member
+1
Did you do all your drilling by hand? I've been setting my project back until I can have access to a drill press, as I'm unsure of my drilling 50% of the time when drilling enclosures...

I know som stuff, but you shouldn't assume that! ;)

if you can’t use a drill press I highly recommend buying a ‘drill guide’, you can get ones where you clamp your drill into them (must be a hammer drill with a space on the front to clamp) and slightly more expensive ones that have a Chuck attached and you just attach your drill to the end.

2435DFEF-BF81-4ECF-928F-890179EF8190.jpeg

A4E169A5-3794-40BC-BF49-DF4F85E8C8B1.jpeg

I have a drill guide like the bottom one and I have used it with an ancient cheap hammer drill (hammer function off!) to make several partscasters, including drilling studs for floyd roses.

do plenty of test drills first to make sure there is no (or minimal) runout with your drill, and use Brad point drill bits since they walk way less than HSS bits, and drill a much cleaner hole.

cheap and invaluable tool since free-hand drilling, you’ll never have a hole that’s completely straight, and when drilling wood the bit will always get pulled along the grain.

Fair warning, even with a drill press getting straight string thru holes is difficult.
 

SillyOctpuss

Well-known member
Nice looking neck. I may have missed it in the earlier part of the thread but which allparts neck did you go for?

I dopped my tele partscaster off at a luthiers yesterday to get the frets properly dressed and a new nut fitted to finish it off. Can't wait to get it back.
W00t just had a call from the boys down at Feline guitars are ready for collection. I'll post a new thread on these after I get them back. I gave them my partscaster tele to finish off and some fretwork/nut work on my prs.
 

peccary

Well-known member
For drilling it depends. I have a drill press but only use it for enclosures and guitar things that absolutely have to be straight. Most hardware installation I do with a hand drill. As far as the set up goes I'll run thru the steps. It's pretty simple and every guitar player should know how to do it because it's such a personal thing.

I've had my bass set up by a pro a couple of times. Both times they told me that my action was too low, one felt the need to tell me how much my string choice is wrong because they are too flexible.

I always thought it was weird to tell someone that their preferred setup is "wrong" since there's so much personal feel that goes in to it, especially on am instrument you've been playing for decades.

But just to add: on my Warmoth bass I used a hand drill for all the hardware. Most holes are pretty shallow and I feel like a press would need to be pretty large to maneuver a guitar body on it.
 

thewintersoldier

Well-known member
I've had my bass set up by a pro a couple of times. Both times they told me that my action was too low, one felt the need to tell me how much my string choice is wrong because they are too flexible.

I always thought it was weird to tell someone that their preferred setup is "wrong" since there's so much personal feel that goes in to it, especially on am instrument you've been playing for decades.

But just to add: on my Warmoth bass I used a hand drill for all the hardware. Most holes are pretty shallow and I feel like a press would need to be pretty large to maneuver a guitar body on it.
I have drilled mounting holes in the neck heel and that shit was stressful, even with a drill press. When doing anything precision like that you have to make sure everything is squared up and clamped down. Even then you second guess everything that lad you to that point lol for shallow holes like hardware and pickguards I find hand hand drill is more than fine.
 

Harry Klippton

Well-known member
I've had my bass set up by a pro a couple of times. Both times they told me that my action was too low, one felt the need to tell me how much my string choice is wrong because they are too flexible.

I always thought it was weird to tell someone that their preferred setup is "wrong" since there's so much personal feel that goes in to it, especially on am instrument you've been playing for decades.

But just to add: on my Warmoth bass I used a hand drill for all the hardware. Most holes are pretty shallow and I feel like a press would need to be pretty large to maneuver a guitar body on it.
My only experiences with trying to get guitars set up were like that. "We can't set this up with that string gauge in that tuning. It's not possible." Obviously someone sets up Tony Iommi's guitars. So I learned to do it myself. I'm not great at it but it's better than paying too much for a glorified string change.
 

peccary

Well-known member
I have drilled mounting holes in the neck heel and that shit was stressful, even with a drill press. When doing anything precision like that you have to make sure everything is squared up and clamped down. Even then you second guess everything that lad you to that point lol for shallow holes like hardware and pickguards I find hand hand drill is more than fine.
Yeah, I should be more clear that I'm talking about most mounting hardware. The neck I installed had the body mounting holes already drilled, and I'd do those in a press. Also the tuner holes if they're not already drilled out.
 

thewintersoldier

Well-known member
My only experiences with trying to get guitars set up were like that. "We can't set this up with that string gauge in that tuning. It's not possible." Obviously someone sets up Tony Iommi's guitars. So I learned to do it myself. I'm not great at it but it's better than paying too much for a glorified string change.
I learned a long time ago because I was so sick and tired of half assed setups, generic excuses, damage to guitars and over paying. I've been doing it for almost twenty years so I have learned a thing or two along the way, I'll show you guys how to get it dialed in to YOUR playing style.
 
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SillyOctpuss

Well-known member
I've had my bass set up by a pro a couple of times. Both times they told me that my action was too low, one felt the need to tell me how much my string choice is wrong because they are too flexible.

I always thought it was weird to tell someone that their preferred setup is "wrong" since there's so much personal feel that goes in to it, especially on am instrument you've been playing for decades.

But just to add: on my Warmoth bass I used a hand drill for all the hardware. Most holes are pretty shallow and I feel like a press would need to be pretty large to maneuver a guitar body on it.
That's pretty unprofessional IMO and not someone I'd ever use more than once. I've been to guys like that and have never been happy with the setup I've received.

The guys I use at Feline guitars in London are fantastic. Their work is absolutely top notch they really are as good as it gets. There are cheaper luthiers I could go to but I always know they'll do it right. They talk through exactly what you want and always get you to try the guitar out before you leave so they can make any last minute adjustments if something isn't exactly how you like it.

I'm quite comfortable doing my own setups, wiring etc but when it comes to fretwork or installing nuts etc I always hand that off to a pro. I have neither the tools or the experience to do it properly. I'd love to do a course one day to learn that stuff though.

This is a blog the guys at feline did for some work on Richie Faulkner's les paul after the headstock came off. It was a pretty major repair and an excellent read

.
 

Harry Klippton

Well-known member
That's pretty unprofessional IMO and not someone I'd ever use more than once. I've been to guys like that and have never been happy with the setup I've received.

The guys I use at Feline guitars in London are fantastic. Their work is absolutely top notch they really are as good as it gets. There are cheaper luthiers I could go to but I always know they'll do it right. They talk through exactly what you want and always get you to try the guitar out before you leave so they can make any last minute adjustments if something isn't exactly how you like it.

I'm quite comfortable doing my own setups, wiring etc but when it comes to fretwork or installing nuts etc I always hand that off to a pro. I have neither the tools or the experience to do it properly. I'd love to do a course one day to learn that stuff though.

This is a blog the guys at feline did for some work on Richie Faulkner's les paul after the headstock came off. It was a pretty major repair and an excellent read

.
That was incredible
 

thewintersoldier

Well-known member
That's pretty unprofessional IMO and not someone I'd ever use more than once. I've been to guys like that and have never been happy with the setup I've received.

The guys I use at Feline guitars in London are fantastic. Their work is absolutely top notch they really are as good as it gets. There are cheaper luthiers I could go to but I always know they'll do it right. They talk through exactly what you want and always get you to try the guitar out before you leave so they can make any last minute adjustments if something isn't exactly how you like it.

I'm quite comfortable doing my own setups, wiring etc but when it comes to fretwork or installing nuts etc I always hand that off to a pro. I have neither the tools or the experience to do it properly. I'd love to do a course one day to learn that stuff though.

This is a blog the guys at feline did for some work on Richie Faulkner's les paul after the headstock came off. It was a pretty major repair and an excellent read

.
Fret work and nut/saddle making is an art form, it takes lots of practice to get good at it. If you want to learn I always suggest practicing on a cheap beater guitar. I have a lot of the tools because I was learning how years ago. But even now, I feel like fretwork is better to find someone good and pay them. Ends don't justify the means imo!
 

SillyOctpuss

Well-known member
Fret work and nut/saddle making is an art form, it takes lots of practice to get good at it. If you want to learn I always suggest practicing on a cheap beater guitar. I have a lot of the tools because I was learning how years ago. But even now, I feel like fretwork is better to find someone good and pay them. Ends don't justify the means imo!

Completely agree. I really enjoy setting up my guitars, doing wiring mods, swopping out parts, even stripping and refinishing a guitar is fine but I'd rather have my fretwork done by someone I trust.
 

thewintersoldier

Well-known member
so new headstock decals came in, last one was just slightly to big but the guy I buy from is a boss and made it right. here was the first one:
PXL-20210822-222729731-2.jpg

so if you've never done a headstock decal its pretty strait forward. First thing I do is clean the headstock with naptha to remove any oil or residue that would interfere with adhesion. next I need to trim the decal. Here it is before I trim it. It has a light layer of lacquer over the top to give added protection, just like Fender did back in the day.
PXL-20210830-202157856.jpg

here it is all trimmed up. Make sure it fits and if you need to trim it more do so. On my first one I thought it would fit but it went under the tuner bushings some. This one is just like it should be. I like to use images of vintage examples as a reference.
PXL-20210830-203439940.jpg

Now that the headstock is wiped clean, I have some paper towel ready, and i get my water.
Your water should be luke warm. To cold and the glue on the back of the decal wont adhere right. To hot and the decal can wrinkle and become distorted. Put it in the water and let it sit about 15-20 seconds, If the decal slides on the backing it's ready.
PXL-20210830-203711506.jpg

These next steps I don't have pictures of as I needed both hands. Add a few drops of water to the headstock to help the decal slide into place smoothly while you position it. Gently slide the decal off the backing paper, don't wrinkle it. Once it's in place hold one end of the decal and use the paper towel to gently blot the decal. as you go across the decal with the paper towel getting the water out now you can gently smooth out the decal removing any excess water and air bubbles. You want it smooth and flat to the headstock. Once it dries it will flatten out.
PXL-20210830-205220738.jpg

here it is all done
PXL-20210830-211104535.jpg
 

SillyOctpuss

Well-known member
Thanks for this part @thewintersoldier

I've never fitted a headstock decal before and now my tele is back I'm going to order a couple of custom decals for it and my strat. I don't really like looking at blank headstocks but always thought you had to spray nitro over the top. I've been holding off on my strat until I got someone who could spray it for me. Now I know I can add it over the nitro the only thing stopping me is finalising the design.
 
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thewintersoldier

Well-known member
Thanks for this part @thewintersoldier

I've never fitted a headstock decal before and now my tele is back I'm going to order a couple of custom decals for it and my strat. I don't really like looking at blank headstocks but always thought you had to spray nitro over the top. I've been holding off on my strat until I got someone who could spray it for me. Now I know I can add it over the nitro the only thing stopping me is finalising the design.
It's fairly simple. You can either bury the decal in nitro or poly or leave it on top of the finish. I think It looks cooler on top plus it's vintage accurate. The decals aren't that fragile. As long as they don't get saturated or you go out of our way to scratch them they are good.
 
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SillyOctpuss

Well-known member
It's fairly simple. You can either bury the decal in nitro or poly or leave it on top of the finish. I think It looks cooler on top plus it's vintage accurate. The decals aren't that fragile. As long as they don't get saturated or you go out of our way to scratch them they are good.
I genuinely never realised they used to fit them over the finish. Then as soon as you mentioned it it made total sense as to how you see headstocks that look like this

1958-fender-telecaster-custom-38.jpg
 
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