Two-Speed Rotary Speaker (Leslie-style) sounds ?

I Love Music

New member
Thinking of the Organ Donor pedal.

I built it, I love it, but I would love it more if I could run it into a rotary speaker sim with 2 speeds on a stomp switch. I'd guess that other keyboard players would also be interested ?
 

Jaga

New member
 

I Love Music

New member
Jaga-

I'm all old school, I like the Hammond + Leslie sound.

I also dig stuff like that Rototron, if one must simulate a simulation. :)

To do a rotary speaker simulation justice you need a foot stomp switch that switches from slow to fast speed "rotation" slowly , say 3 seconds of rotary (LFO) speedup or slowdown after the switch is stomped. It's integral to the concept of the simulation.

Neither Pythagoras nor Octagon support such a switch natively, unless you wire a stomp switch in place of one of the three function pots ?

Ideas about that ?
 

phi1

Active member
I built one that incorporates a momentary footswitch on one of the control inputs (for tap tempo or other functions) and you can still use a pot on that control input. (FV-1 Lab build report).

I don’t know anything about programming a rotary speaker patch though.
 

Jaga

New member
I'm all old school, I like the Hammond + Leslie sound.
Who doesn't like old school? The only way to be true old school is to buy real Hammond and real Leslie. Every other option is just an approximation. :)

I think "fast" and "slow" speeds on real leslie originate from the leslie design. BTW, there are interesting discussions like this: https://forums.tomsguide.com/threads/leslie-custom-speed-control-help.244808/

If emulation introduces new features (such as variable speed) why not use them?
 

I Love Music

New member
I would recommend the Boss RT-20 Rotary Ensemble. It's very good and you can find them used for about $150. Any Leslie simulator will sound much better in stereo.

You can add a 2 speed switch to just about anything, including the speed up and slow down effect, using the Geofex LERA:
http://www.geofex.com/article_folders/lera/lera.htm
I was imagining not stereo, but woofer and tweeter outputs from the rotary cabs. Now that I imagine stero, FV-1 can do that as well if you use both outputs.

VERY NICE lyra 2-speed circuit you suggest, and it could include an extra pot for spin-down speed, discharging the electrolytic more slowly. I'm stealing this for my bench schematics folder in my laptop. :)

Does anyone else have a favorite rotary pedal that would simulate well with the pedalpcb fv-1 boards ?

I'm hoping the guys upstairs will read this and make a kit I can build !
 

I Love Music

New member
I looked and listened on YouTube. My vote goes for the SpinCycle pedal from Experimental Noize. It's a bit larger footprint than the boards I see here, possibly it could be adapted to a smaller size. It seems to use a combo of analog distortion, digital LFO effecting both volume and phase, and a solid state (mosfet) tube emulator. In short, I think it could be done well by the PedalPCB guys.
 

chilidog

New member
The sound of a Leslie is much more complicated than just a bit of tremolo and phaser. You get both of those, but there's also the effect of the sound bouncing around in the Leslie cabinet, and then the sound being thrown around and bouncing off the walls of the room that it's in.
Source: I own a Hammond and 2 Leslies.

I listened to the ProGuitarShop demo of the SpinCycle and I thought it sounded awful. And Andy can make anything sound good. That being said, I'm sure the DSP involved is quite complicated. There's just so much involved in the sound that needs to be simulated, which is why rotary pedals cost the big bucks.

If you have to go diy, I would suggest a Univibe, Boss CE-1 clone, or a phaser (like the Pearl PH-44 clone by DeadendFX), and build the Geofex LERA into it to give you the speed up/slow down. You might also consider a harmonic tremolo with the LERA. Another option is the trying to find a Vomit Comet PCB from diablochris: http://www.madbeanpedals.com/forum/index.php?topic=26406.0
 

I Love Music

New member
I listened to the ProGuitarShop demo of the SpinCycle and I thought it sounded awful. And Andy can make anything sound good. That being said, I'm sure the DSP involved is quite complicated. There's just so much involved in the sound that needs to be simulated, which is why rotary pedals cost the big bucks.
I watched the same video, and thought "what a crappy way to demo a keyboard effect" (using a guitar).
 
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