What's on the workbench?

MichaelW

Well-known member
That's... Weird. The original didn't have a tone switch, not even internally. Second version had clipping and tone switches internally. I think the second one also had 2 or 3 pairs of SMD LEDs (definitely LEDs just unsure how many) for clipping, other mode was no diodes. Jesus Christ JPTR is changing his pedals without even writing notes on them what changed.

EDIT: found the gut shot I took of mine. 2 germanium diodes and a clear red LED per side in the OG. Second version was 3 SMD LEDs per side with a dip switch to bypass them.
WHat's the "warning" bit? Is it supposed to be serious?
 

MichaelW

Well-known member
So you flip the board over after soldering each component to make sure you had through flow? That’s next level.

What BS Mojo parts are you seeing?
Um....I do that with all my builds during the inspection phase. And if there isn't enough flow through to make me happy I'll reflow that one leg until I can at least see some solder poking through. Is that wrong? I always thought this was a "best practice...."
 

Big Monk

Well-known member
Um....I do that with all my builds during the inspection phase. And if there isn't enough flow through to make me happy I'll reflow that one leg until I can at least see some solder poking through. Is that wrong? I always thought this was a "best practice...."
Wrong? No.

Best practice? 🤷🏼‍♂️

If you can visualize what the pad/through plating/pad structure is like, think a spool. If solder completely fills a pad on one side, you have continuity to the pad on the other.

In short, filling the whole “spool” with solder is not required for a long lasting, durable connection.

On the other hand, some may find it visualizing distracting to see inconsistency on the “fill”.

I’m not one of those people and as much as I’m trying to treat form and function equally, that seems like overkill.
 

MichaelW

Well-known member
Wrong? No.

Best practice? 🤷🏼‍♂️

If you can visualize what the pad/through plating/pad structure is like, think a spool. If solder completely fills a pad on one side, you have continuity to the pad on the other.

In short, filling the whole “spool” with solder is not required for a long lasting, durable connection.

On the other hand, some may find it visualizing distracting to see inconsistency on the “fill”.

I’m not one of those people and as much as I’m trying to treat form and function equally, that seems like overkill.
I think for me I'm a bit paranoid about cold solder joints. There was a point (maybe 40 pedals ago hahaha) that I was reflowing every joint on the board by default just to ensure no cold joints. And this was because of a pedal I built early on that didn't work, then after reflowing all the joints it worked. Never did track down which joint the problem was. I've gotten a lot better at doing a good solder joint to begin with and have a lot more confidence in my inspection capabilities and knowing what I'm looking for, but I still like to see a little flow through, then I KNOW it's got a solid molecular bond to the pad.
 

Route14

Well-known member
I think for me I'm a bit paranoid about cold solder joints. There was a point (maybe 40 pedals ago hahaha) that I was reflowing every joint on the board by default just to ensure no cold joints. And this was because of a pedal I built early on that didn't work, then after reflowing all the joints it worked. Never did track down which joint the problem was. I've gotten a lot better at doing a good solder joint to begin with and have a lot more confidence in my inspection capabilities and knowing what I'm looking for, but I still like to see a little flow through, then I KNOW it's got a solid molecular bond to the pad.
The first time I got into building pedals was back in 2004/5. I was buying boards from Tonepad and they are etched with the trace on one side of the board. I feel like on those boards it was much easier to get cold joints or accidentally bridge two pads. The boards like PPCB makes are much easier to work with in my experience. With my bad eyesight I sometimes I wish the pads were a little bigger or not so tight but I never have a problem. They can also withstand a reasonable amount of desoldering and part removal when required.

Sometimes I might reflow some joints if they "look ugly" but I almost never attack the front side. It takes a lot of patience for me to try and not make things "perfect" and I find that when I start second guessing my work I end up actually creating a problem! I have no idea if my soldering technique is good but I've built so many pedals at this point I need to trust myself.
 

Robert

Reverse Engineer
Staff member
I don't solder both sides, but I do solder some components from the top side. I almost always solder pots from the top since there's no other components to get in the way.

Soldering both sides looks nice but it sure makes removing a component a lot more difficult.
 

fig

Village Idiot
I think for me I'm a bit paranoid about cold solder joints. There was a point (maybe 40 pedals ago hahaha) that I was reflowing every joint on the board by default just to ensure no cold joints. And this was because of a pedal I built early on that didn't work, then after reflowing all the joints it worked. Never did track down which joint the problem was. I've gotten a lot better at doing a good solder joint to begin with and have a lot more confidence in my inspection capabilities and knowing what I'm looking for, but I still like to see a little flow through, then I KNOW it's got a solid molecular bond to the pad.
It doesn't seem to be slowing you down ;). You go gurl!
 

Roberman

Member
I didn't want to build another Klon but I supposed I'm forced to. I see accommodations for the Bones' bass version (which I recently built, it's fantastic), are there any other changes besides the knobs and footswitch layout?
 

Robert

Reverse Engineer
Staff member
are there any other changes besides the knobs and footswitch layout?

Nothing major or audio related, although I decided to improve the polarity protection in this one since it's a "Special Edition" ... The standard configuration has always haunted me.

We still have the usual 12V zener overvoltage protection for the charge pump, but I decided to add a series diode and current limiting resistor so the zener doesn't self-destruct in reverse polarity or overvoltage conditions.

1667441441786.png

I did make sure the box cap footprints were large enough for the Boneyard mod. :)
 
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