Is any coding experience necessary?

JamieJ

Well-known member
I’ve been thinking about either picking up a terrarium PCB in my next order or waiting for the paludarium.

I haven’t got any coding experience at all. Is it manageable to learn how to code without any background knowledge?
 

pedalsandchill

New member
I’ve been thinking about either picking up a terrarium PCB in my next order or waiting for the paludarium.

I haven’t got any coding experience at all. Is it manageable to learn how to code without any background knowledge?
I have zero C++ or general script programming background. And I'm struggling pretty hard trying to learn. I've spoke with someone earlier on a different thread about building effects in pure data and compiling those in C++. But I haven't really had the chance to try it yet. And from what I've read, there can be some compatibility issues and editing to the code you would need to do.
 

JamieJ

Well-known member
I have zero C++ or general script programming background. And I'm struggling pretty hard trying to learn. I've spoke with someone earlier on a different thread about building effects in pure data and compiling those in C++. But I haven't really had the chance to try it yet. And from what I've read, there can be some compatibility issues and editing to the code you would need to do.
Thanks for this. It definitely seems like a very steep learning curve.

Do you just rely on using other peoples code at the moment?
 

pedalsandchill

New member
Thanks for this. It definitely seems like a very steep learning curve.

Do you just rely on using other peoples code at the moment?
Can't say I do.
Actually, I guess you could say I do. I'm just using a stock effect that was loaded into it when I got it. There just really aren't many effects others have made from what I've seen. Maybe 3-4?
I'm trying to teach myself at least a bit of C++ before messing with it, that way I have a somewhat basic understanding of how it works. Unfortunately, most tutorials I've come across do not really cover DSP, but instead focus more on "hello world".
 
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maxl0rd

New member
I don't think it's a good way to learn to code. It will be hyper frustrating. There are at least 3 boulders, and you'll be taking them all at the same time instead of 1 by 1:
  1. c++ the language itself is hard enough to learn
  2. signal processing algorithms, etc. ... the useful work, mysteries abound
  3. embedded development workflow, getting code on to the micro, testing and debugging etc. ... frustration city
I would write some useful little programs on a laptop first, to build a foundation, before diving into microcontrollers.
 

tcpoint

Active member
I agree with maxl0rd that this isn't the best platform to learn how to code. It's hard enough when you know C++ and have embedded experience. I saw that from lots of experience.
 

JamieJ

Well-known member
Thanks for all your thoughts @tcpoint, @maxl0rd and @pedalsandchill - I was looking for a new challenge so not sure if building a terrarium is potentially worth it from the perspective of learning to code.

I might build one anyway and just use the examples on here and GitHub to see how it plays with the long term project of getting better at understanding code. 👍🏻
 

zgrav

Well-known member
The few projects that are out there are very impressive.
I agree. The reverb and rhythmic delay are solid. Only a matter of time before we see interesting things that push the envelope from where the FV-1 chips have gone.
 
I agree with other's comments here - it will be a pain to learn enough C++ to make new effects. I had python experience before starting to code in C for the Daisy stuff and that switch was alright, but from no coding will be rough.

One thing that I think you could learn to do with no coding experience is to slightly modify others effects though - which could still be fun and useful. Maybe you want to increase the max delay time on the Rhythmic Delay - it would just be changing 1 number in the code. Maybe you hate the knob/switch layout for a reverb effect you found online - that is a pretty simple change in the code. If you want to build a Terrarium to load up others programs anyways, it could be fun to poke around and change small things like this.
 

JamieJ

Well-known member
I agree with other's comments here - it will be a pain to learn enough C++ to make new effects. I had python experience before starting to code in C for the Daisy stuff and that switch was alright, but from no coding will be rough.

One thing that I think you could learn to do with no coding experience is to slightly modify others effects though - which could still be fun and useful. Maybe you want to increase the max delay time on the Rhythmic Delay - it would just be changing 1 number in the code. Maybe you hate the knob/switch layout for a reverb effect you found online - that is a pretty simple change in the code. If you want to build a Terrarium to load up others programs anyways, it could be fun to poke around and change small things like this.
Thanks! Yep I think I will add one to my next PCB order and start to experiment a bit.
 

nikyramone

New member
I agree with other's comments here - it will be a pain to learn enough C++ to make new effects. I had python experience before starting to code in C for the Daisy stuff and that switch was alright, but from no coding will be rough.

One thing that I think you could learn to do with no coding experience is to slightly modify others effects though - which could still be fun and useful. Maybe you want to increase the max delay time on the Rhythmic Delay - it would just be changing 1 number in the code. Maybe you hate the knob/switch layout for a reverb effect you found online - that is a pretty simple change in the code. If you want to build a Terrarium to load up others programs anyways, it could be fun to poke around and change small things like this.
This answer is both discouraging and encouraging at the same time :p. I am a complete beginner and I am (at the moment) still trying to digest very carefully the very basics of DSP.I have finished Musimathics vol 1 and I am starting vol 2 and they are amazing so far!
How difficult would it be for a complete beginner to be able to adapt preexisting code to this platform (I am thinking for example the mutable instruments clouds reverb for example). Are we talking years of full time study and dedication?
Is there any gateaway coding language that you would recommend? I thought about Python too but haven´t been able to find many exciting audio projects there.

Thanks by the way. I use your delay program pretty much everyday.
 
@nikyramone With the modules that are already included in the Electro-Smith Daisy repo, I would say learning a bit of coding is more useful than learning DSP to begin with. With a bit of coding knowledge and not much DSP info you could use the modules to produce some new effect combinations, or of course modify other effects.

Even with no prior DSP or coding knowledge, you could start making original stuff (using the module blocks already there) in <months if you were motivated - which it sounds like you are if you are working through DSP courses/lessons. All the Daisy stuff is written in C++, so learning python (which is my preferred language and easier) is not useful for syntax - but is useful for learning general coding practices.

I am glad you are enjoying the Rhythmic Delay program.....there is a decent amount of comments in that code, so it may be a good place to start poking at and modifying code....:).
 
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